Sesquicentennial News, 23 July 1866

23 July 1866

The USS Nipsic enters the harbor of Bahia, Brazil and fires a 21 gun salute to apologize for the acts of piracy and murder carried out by USS Wachusett when this ship captured CSS Florida in violation of international law and Brazilian sovereignty.

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Sesquicentennial News, Friday 10 November 1865

Friday, 10 November 1865

Captain Henry Wirz, who commanded a part of the Fort Sumter Confederate prison at Andersonville, GA was hanged after conviction by a military commission on charges of cruelty to Federal prisoners of war. This is perhaps the greatest single unjust act committed by the victors. The defendant was not allowed a defense and many of the witnesses’ statements were later proven false and many had not been at the prison at time they claimed. Further, Captain Wirz was not even at the prison at the time the alleged events took place.

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Sesquicentennial News, Monday 06 November 1865

Monday, 06 November 1865

The Confederate cruiser CSS Shenandoah was surrendered by Lieutenant James Waddell to British officials at Liverpool.

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Sesquicentennial News, Monday, 30 October 1865

Monday, 30 October 1865

Confederate Marine Corps Sergeant George Canning died aboard CSS Shenandoah and became the last active duty casualty of the American War Between the States.

 

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Sesquicentennial News, Wednesday 25 October 1865

Wednesday, 25 October 1865

A convention meets in Milledgeville, GA to repeal Georgia’s ordinance of secession and amend or replace the 1861 constitution.

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Sesquicentennial News, Saturday 14 October 1865

Saturday, October 14, 1865

In Kansas, on the Little Arkansas River, Kit Carson, William Bent, General Hamey, and Colonel Leavenworth, among others representing the United States, have been discussing and counseling with Chieftain Representatives of the Kiowa, Comanche, Plains Apache, Southern Cheyenne, and Southern Arapaho.   The whites want peace and unmolested traffic on the Santa Fe Trail.  They also want the Indians to confine their activities to designated areas or reservations.  The Indians want unrestricted hunting grounds and they want money with land reparations for the Chivington massacre of Black Kettle’s tribe on Sand Creek last November.  The result of the days of talks is the “Little Arkansas Treaty,” an agreement that confines the Indians much to the traditional areas of their tribes, gives land and money to the surviving members of Black Kettle’s band, and guarantees protection from molestation by whites in Indian Territory.  There are other provisions in the treaty (you can see the full treaty at   http://www.yale.edu/lawweb/avalon/ntreaty/apchar65.htm ), but they are not worth reporting on at this time, because the US Government will never honor one provision, and the entire agreement will be considered null after 18 months.

The Northern press has begun its efforts to discredit and demean President Johnson at every opportunity.  In today’s “Harper’s Weekly”, the most important media element in the North at this time, the front page has drawings of President Johnson and a room full of men, with the caption “President Andrew Johnson Pardoning Rebels at the White House.”  On another page, there is a picture of the tailor’s shop that President Johnson ran in his younger years.  This picture has interest as it is a reminder to Northern voters of Johnson’s “commoner” upbringings.

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Sesquicentennial News, Thursday 12 October 1865

Thursday, 12 October 1865

Martial law ended in Kentucky by presidential proclamation.

The CSS Shenandoah sighted many sails but kept her distance.  Crossing 10 degrees North she picked up the Tradewinds.

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Sesquicentennial News, Wednesday 11 October 1865

Wednesday, 11 October 1865

President Johnson paroled Confederate Vice-President Alexander H. Stephens, Cabinet members John H. Reagan and George A. Trenholm, Governor Charles Clark of Mississippi and Assistant Secretary of War John A. Campbell. All had been held in prison since the collapse of their country.

The CSS Shenandoah crossed the Equator midway between South America and Africa headed for England.  Some of the crew had wanted to go to Capetown but Lieutenant Waddell, Commanding Officer, held to his decision.

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Sesquicentennial News, Wednesday 27 September 1865

Wednesday, 27 September 1865

In San Francisco Bay, circus performer James Cook is successful in walking a tightrope in a 450 ft. crossing from Cliff House Restaurant to Seal Rocks for an audience of 1,500 people.  His first attempt was three days ago and had to be abandoned because of high wind gusts.  Both attempts were performed without his signature “Grizzly bear cub” on his back.

In New York State, today, the last Confederate prisoners are removed from Elmira prison camp.  For the past 15 months the army training camp, known as Camp Rathbun, has been used as a prison for Confederate captured.  Of the 12,100 Southerners held here, 2,963 have died of poor nourishment, poor medical treatment, and exposure to the harsh winter with nothing but a tent for shelter and warmth.  There are wooden barracks, but only enough for about half the prisoner occupation.  The water is contaminated and the source of much of the disease.  In an area untouched by the war and easily supplied by the rails just outside the walls, the starvations and shelter deficiencies can only be deliberate and punishment for participation in the war opposing the United States.  Now that it is closed, it will be abandoned and in a couple of years fields of grain will take its place.  Twenty-five percent of the prisoners brought here have died. Camp commander, Col. Hoffman, will be exonerated in the Northern Press for his retaliatory measures, therefore infamy will be denied him.

Elmira Prison Camp, New York

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Sesquicentennial News, Monday 18 September 1865

Monday, 18 September 1865

In Atlanta, GA, Carrie Berry writes in her diary, “Mon. Sept. 18. I got up early this ‘morning and went after my books. Mama sayed that I would have to stop school for she could not do all the work herself.”

In Virginia, General Lee, in his uniform of gray, rides quietly into Lexington, astride Traveler.  He has removed all insignia and the Confederate buttons, per the Federal requirements, so there is nothing to identify him as anyone special.  He is invited to be the guest of Colonel S. McD. Reid, the senior member of the board of Trustees of Washington College, who is not expecting him until tomorrow, so Lee is looking for a hotel for the night.  Soon people begin to recognize him and speak to him.  In answer to their greetings, he bows and removes his hat.  At the Inn, several of Lee’s soldiers, who were loitering in the street, come to greet him, helping him from his horse.  Professor James White, Reid’s son-in-law and a member of the college faculty, who happens upon the scene, hurriedly assures Lee that all is ready for him at the Reid house, and conducts him to that place where he is well received.  He spends an enjoyable afternoon with the Reid’s, especially in the attention of the children of the household.  Tomorrow. he will get the tour of his new college home as he has never seen it before.

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